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This isn’t a complaint about the five women photographers (Karen Ciamente, Pamela Z. Daum, Sandra Holata, Christine Morrow and Diane Seskes) who have a wonderful exhibit going for them at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church art gallery. Their stuff is fine, but more on that later.

What I wish is that galleries and artists could work together to use only non-glare glass or nothing covering the artwork on the walls. Some of the time it’s like looking in a mirror rather than at a superb photograph. At others you get a real good notion of the lighting system in the galleries.

Now, with my whining aside, it’s clear that the photographers in this show are bursting with talent and some pretty nifty technique in their creations.

From a walk-through, there doesn’t seem to be much more of a central theme than that given in the exhibit title – the way they see it. But what’s the it?

For one thing, and loosely put, it’s the world around them. Pamela Daum, who was recently featured in the “Life’s a Beach” exhibit at Summit Artspace (a Knight Arts grantee) brought 15 numbered works in her “Land of Enchantment” series. Daum is highly gifted, whether in black-and-white, infrared technique or full-blown color photography.

Karen Ciamente loves the close-up look. In her “Chevy,” as but one example, she barrels in on an old Chevrolet grill, giving it a great abstract feel.

Karen Ciamente, "Love Will Save the Day." Photo by Roger Durbin

Karen Ciamente, “Love Will Save the Day.” Photo by Roger Durbin

Sandra Holata takes to nature in representative pieces from three series – “Sunflower Series,” “Tree Portrait,” “Human Element,” and “Suburban Portrait.” To get to the idea of how she can approach her material, in the “Human Element,” works she may have an otherwise bucolic scene showing the sometimes flippant and irreverent hint of mankind having been there by leaving behind a discarded automobile tire.

Sandra Holata, "Sunflower." Photo from artist

Sandra Holata, “Sunflower.” Photo from artist

Diane Seskes has included works from her travels – through Minnesota, Michigan, Virginia, Maine, Indiana and around Ohio. Maybe a favorite for local viewers are pieces from the Cuyahoga Valley National Park. For those who have been there, you can appreciate the vivid scenes, the mood of the area, and a fresh look at the area’s great outdoors treasure that is the park.

Diane Seskes, "Unity." Photo by Roger Durbin

Diane Seskes, “Unity.” Photo by Roger Durbin

Christine Morrow has added a nice variety of images, some of nature as the others have done, but some interesting and revealing portraits as well.

Christine Morrow, "Becoming, Part I." Photo by Roger Durbin

Christine Morrow, “Becoming, Part I.” Photo by Roger Durbin

It’s really nice that St. Paul’s has the mission to present local artists, not to mention giving them the opportunity to make a living at it by having the pieces for sale. The church does this for its parish community to be sure, but it also has opened its doors for the wider area to enjoy.

"The Way We See It" postcard.

“The Way We See It” postcard.

The five women of “The Way We See It” will be present for a “Meet the Artists” reception at the church on Sunday, April 14, from 12-2 p.m.

“The Way We See It” will be available for viewing 9 a.m.-7 p.m., Monday-Friday; 10 a.m.-12 p.m. on Saturday;  and 9 a.m.-2 p.m. on Sunday through May 30 at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church Art Gallery, 1361 W. Market St.; Akron; 330-836-9327; www.stpaulsakron.org. Admission is free.

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